Earth science lab relative dating 2

21-Jan-2020 01:12

Most of them are able to do this pretty easily, after which I ask "why? But in the discussion, I also mention that even though we know who is oldest, youngest, and their relative order, we don't know After the introduction, we take some time to whole group read over the brief text on relative/absolute dating.

" After 30 - 60 seconds, we come back together and discuss, where I solicit a few responses.This matching process is called correlation, which has been an important process in constructing geological timescales.Some fossils, called index fossils, are particularly useful in correlating rocks.Once they are able to manipulate the cards into the correct sequence, they are asked to do a similar sequencing activity using fossil pictures printed on "rock layer" cards.Sequencing the rock layers will show students how paleontologists use fossils to give relative dates to rock strata.

" After 30 - 60 seconds, we come back together and discuss, where I solicit a few responses.

This matching process is called correlation, which has been an important process in constructing geological timescales.

Some fossils, called index fossils, are particularly useful in correlating rocks.

Once they are able to manipulate the cards into the correct sequence, they are asked to do a similar sequencing activity using fossil pictures printed on "rock layer" cards.

Sequencing the rock layers will show students how paleontologists use fossils to give relative dates to rock strata.

For a fossil to be a good index fossil, it needs to have lived during one specific time period, be easy to identify and have been abundant and found in many places. If you find ammonites in a rock in the South Island and also in a rock in the North Island, you can say that both rocks are Mesozoic.