Ethics of dating a coworker

17-Nov-2019 10:24

An abandonment or violation of trust by someone close to you. An employee passed over for a promotion by an employer who had promised it.A secret between friends brought to light for all to see. The preliminary stages of Judas' betrayal are recorded in Matthew -16.The mental anguish caused by the betrayal of Judas, one of Jesus' disciples and closest friends, is an often overlooked aspect of Jesus' suffering. We read in Hebrews that Jesus understands all that we encounter and are tempted with, yet did not sin in his own temptations.He pressed on to the task that he was called to by the Father.A promise made to a child so easily broken by a parent. Several questions come to mind, particularly as Judas' actions fulfilled prophecy: Can Judas be held responsible for betraying Jesus when he was fulfilling prophecy?How do we deal with that inevitable betrayal that will affect us in our everyday lives? Did Judas become disillusioned with Jesus' message and life because Jesus didn't fit Judas' paradigm?Familiarize yourself with the types of romances that can sneak over the line into shaky legal territory.

Most of us would agree that employees’ personal lives should be just that—kept personal. Furthermore, the company’s honchos don’t have the time or the desire to meddle in or monitor the personal romantic life of each employee.

In a 2006 survey published by the Society for Human Resource Management and Career Journal.com, 80% of human resources professionals and 60% of employees polled said that there should not be a romance between a supervisor and subordinate.

(Interestingly, that 80% for HR professionals represented an increase from the prior year’s results while the 60% for employees represented a 10% decrease.) And only 26% of employees polled believe that romance at work should not be between people with a significant rank difference.

We all know or have heard about couples who met at work, fell in love, and lived happily ever after.

Given the number of hours we spend at our jobs, it’s not surprising that many love matches have been made in the workplace. But even if they do, the potential problems employers face from romances at work should not be ignored.

Most of us would agree that employees’ personal lives should be just that—kept personal. Furthermore, the company’s honchos don’t have the time or the desire to meddle in or monitor the personal romantic life of each employee.

In a 2006 survey published by the Society for Human Resource Management and Career Journal.com, 80% of human resources professionals and 60% of employees polled said that there should not be a romance between a supervisor and subordinate.

(Interestingly, that 80% for HR professionals represented an increase from the prior year’s results while the 60% for employees represented a 10% decrease.) And only 26% of employees polled believe that romance at work should not be between people with a significant rank difference.

We all know or have heard about couples who met at work, fell in love, and lived happily ever after.

Given the number of hours we spend at our jobs, it’s not surprising that many love matches have been made in the workplace. But even if they do, the potential problems employers face from romances at work should not be ignored.

Most often, these cases involve workplace romance between employees reporting to each other.